Zealand women porn

Duration: 8min 33sec Views: 1604 Submitted: 11.08.2020
Category: Exclusive
The Government has released a quirky online safety ad campaign in a bid to get parents talking to their children about pornography. The video, Keep It Real Online - Pornography, shares a message that kids need to understand the difference between the pornography world and real-life relationships and the importance of consent. The ad begins with a mother, Sandra, in a dressing gown opening the door to find two naked porn stars, named Sue and Derek, standing on her front porch. The mother calls her son Mitch down as the pair continue to explain that he has been watching them on his laptop, iPad, PlayStation, his phone, her phone, the smart TV and the projector.

Government's online safety campaign features 'porn stars'

Kiwi porn boss on the run from FBI is reportedly in New Zealand - NZ Herald

Dubby Henry is a reporter for the New Zealand Herald. Michael James Pratt, 36, and colleagues from his company GirlsDoPorn are charged with sex trafficking offences, following allegations they conned 22 women into filming pornographic videos. A complaint laid by the women says they responded to ads for modelling jobs but were eventually told the job was really for adult films. They were coerced into filming with claims they could stay anonymous and their films would only be distributed on DVD in foreign counties, according to the complaint. However the films were then broadcast on the hugely popular GirlsDoPorn website, generating millions in revenue, according to the US Justice Department. The women launched a class action suit against the company in the San Diego Superior Court.

NZ uses nude ‘porn actors’ in Web safety ad

New Zealand First's plan to introduce pornography filtering on all New Zealand internet services looks set to fail with its coalition partners Labour and the Greens both declining to support the legislation. The bill was introduced by Minister for Internal Affairs, Tracey Martin, and follows a number of attempts over the years to introduce legislation requiring ISPs to manage the content being accessed by the nation's users. A subsequent select committee hearing proposed a voluntary code be introduced but that also failed to gain traction.
The sudden appearance of a smiling, but nude Sue and Derek has become something of a sensation as part on an unusual series of TV ads by the New Zealand government about Internet safety for young people. After walking in on the scene, her mortified son drops his bowl, while still keeping hold of his laptop, and his mother tells herself it is time to have a chat. It follows a report in December last year that revealed young New Zealanders use the Internet as their first and primary tool to learn about sex — and one-third of the most popular pornography clips viewed in the country depicted non-consensual activities. Another saw the film director Taika Waititi satirically urging New Zealanders to support a new charitable cause: racism.