I want to have sex now

Duration: 4min 36sec Views: 1653 Submitted: 27.10.2019
Category: Exclusive
When you first met your partner, there was electricity, there was passion, and there was sex—lots of it. While there are dozens of reasons for lack of lust—from illness to stress to scheduling—the truth is that sex is healthy for body and mind and builds closeness, intimacy and a sense of partnership in your relationship. We invite you to recognize the real-life obstacles to your healthiest, most fulfilling sex life, so you can find ways to overcome them. Sex Rx: Turn off to get turned on. All you're planning is the time slot—not how the deed will unfold. When it comes to day-to-day priorities, sex often falls low on the totem pole.

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17 Reasons Why You Don’t Want to Have Sex Anymore

Life happens, which means dry spells happen, am I right? No biggie—unless that dry spell morphs into more of a, well, severe drought. Wondering why don't I want to have sex anymore? Factors like stress, time, and kids can seriously zap your sex drive. That said, you shouldn't just give up on your sex life forever.

‘Umm, Why Don’t I Want To Have Sex Anymore?’

Anyone who has ever been in a long-term relationship can probably attest to this golden truth about sex: No matter how great it was at the start of a relationship, things usually slow down eventually. Oftentimes this happens in the form of desire discrepancy—one partner wants to do it, but the other doesn't. You've probably read plenty of sex advice columns telling you what you need to do next: figure out a way to get the spark back, whether that means switching up your routine or going along with sex you don't really want or otherwise finding a way to rekindle your sex life. You are perfectly within reason to want to take a break from sex, even if you're married or dating someone you deeply love. Below are a few reasons why people might not want to have sex with their partner, according to Zhana Vrangalova, Ph.
Back to Sexual health. Find out the things you need to ask yourself if you're thinking about having sex. Most people have sex for the first time when they're 16 or older, not before. If someone's boasting about having sex, it's possible they're pretending.