Dolphins have sex for pleasure

Duration: 5min 47sec Views: 1666 Submitted: 05.03.2020
Category: Exclusive
Your question gets at the heart of what many cognitive scientists in the fields of neuroscience, philosophy, and computer science are trying to address. This great mystery in science is consciousness. In particular, your question is related to the mind-body problem. The issue here is what, if any, neural states in our physical brain lead us to have subjective experiences in our mind, which are called qualia by many people in the field of cognitive science. Besides humans and dolphins, other mammals such as certain monkeys have sex too. Sex usually leads to euphoric pleasures that are related to the release of certain neurotransmitters in our brains.

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Dolphins have sex for the fun of it, say scientists | The Scotsman

Animal sexual behaviour takes many different forms, including within the same species. Common mating or reproductively motivated systems include monogamy , polygyny , polyandry , polygamy and promiscuity. Other sexual behaviour may be reproductively motivated e. When animal sexual behaviour is reproductively motivated, it is often termed mating or copulation ; for most non-human mammals , mating and copulation occur at oestrus the most fertile period in the mammalian female's reproductive cycle , which increases the chances of successful impregnation.

Dolphins’ complex clitorises are the key to understanding their sex lives

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These are the core obsessions that drive our newsroom—defining topics of seismic importance to the global economy. Our emails are made to shine in your inbox, with something fresh every morning, afternoon, and weekend. The structure of female dolphin reproductive anatomy, though, can speak for itself. At the Experimental Biology conference held April in Orlando, Florida, marine mammal researcher Dara Orbach presented preliminary findings from one of the first studies to examine bottlenose dolphin clitorises. Orbach and her co-author, Patricia Brennan, both from Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, were surprised to find dolphin clitorises have several bundles of nerves, similar to human clitorises.