Orgasm in sex

Duration: 14min 46sec Views: 501 Submitted: 15.12.2019
Category: Asian
The orgasm is widely regarded as the peak of sexual excitement. It is a powerful feeling of physical pleasure and sensation, which includes a discharge of accumulated erotic tension. Overall though, not a great deal is known about the orgasm, and over the past century, theories about the orgasm and its nature have shifted dramatically. For instance, healthcare experts have only relatively recently come round to the idea of the female orgasm, with many doctors as recently as the s claiming that it was normal for women not to experience them. In this article, we will explain what an orgasm is in men and women, why it happens, and explain some common misconceptions. Orgasms can be defined in different ways using different criteria.

Orgasmic Dysfunction

Orgasmic Dysfunction: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

Anorgasmia is the medical term for regular difficulty reaching orgasm after ample sexual stimulation. The lack of orgasms distresses you or interferes with your relationship with your partner. Orgasms vary in intensity, and women vary in the frequency of their orgasms and the amount of stimulation needed to trigger an orgasm. Most women require some degree of direct or indirect clitoral stimulation and don't climax from penetration alone.

What is an orgasm?

Although some women experience orgasm with vaginal penetration during sex, most women are orgasmic only during stimulation of the clitoris. Differences in how women and men experience orgasms can lead to unrealistic expectations and a misinterpretation of the meaning of sexual response. Effectively communicating with your partner to identify what you want in a sexual relationship can be a challenge. But it's important to be open with your partner.
Orgasm is one of the most intense pleasures attainable to an organism, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. On the basis of existing literatures, this article introduces a novel mechanistic model of sexual stimulation and orgasm. In doing so, it characterizes the neurophenomenology of sexual trance and climax, describes parallels in dynamics between orgasms and seizures, speculates on possible evolutionary origins of sex differences in orgasmic responding, and proposes avenues for future experimentation. Here, a model is introduced wherein sexual stimulation induces entrainment of coupling mechanical and neuronal oscillatory systems, thus creating synchronized functional networks within which multiple positive feedback processes intersect synergistically to contribute to sexual experience. These processes generate states of deepening sensory absorption and trance, potentially culminating in climax if critical thresholds are surpassed.